DIAMONDS

Composition

  • Diamond is made with 99.95% of a single element: carbon

  • Graphite shares the same unique feature with Diamond but their formation and crystal arrangement are very different. As a result although chemically the same, graphite is so soft it is use for writing, and diamond is the hardest of gems. Only a diamond can scratch another diamond


Colours

  • Diamonds come in many different colours. The largest number comes in the range of colorless to brown but the rarest are in fancy colours.

  • Most valuable hues are pink, blue and green. The strongest and more vivid colours commend higher prices. 

Modern Birthstones lists

  • Marks the 60th and 75th wedding anniversaries

  • Modern birthstone for the month of April, the zodiac sign Aries and the Chinese year of the dog

CURE - HEAL - PROTECT - AID

  • JAUNDICE

  • ANGER

  • APOPLEXY

  • PALSY

  • HUNGER

  • MALICE

  • crushed

Facts
Therapeutic applications

Famous Diamonds

Portuguese

Portuguese

The strong blue fluorescence of the 127.01cts Portuguese Diamond makes it look whiter than its GIA grade of M/VS1 would suggest. The diamond owes its name to a legend that claimed the diamond was found in Brazil in the mid-18th century and became part of the Portuguese Crown Jewels. photo Chip Clark, Smithsonian Institute http://geogallery.si.edu/index.php/10002688/portuguese-diamond

Allnatt

Allnatt

This 101.29cts, vivid yellow diamond is truly exceptional. The color is the result of nitrogen atoms that replaced some of the crystal’s carbon atoms. The gem is named after its former British owner, Major Alfred Ernest Allnatt. From the De Beers mine in South Africa. photo NMNH, Smithsonian Institute http://geogallery.si.edu/index.php/10026484/allnatt-diamond

Hope Diamond

Hope Diamond

The 45.52-carat Hope Diamond is famous for its rare colour, rich history, and red phosphorescence. photo : Chip Clark, Smithsonian Institute http://mineralsciences.si.edu/hope.htm

Eureka

Eureka

By Source, Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=24508039

Tiffany Yellow

Tiffany Yellow

The 128.54 cts, fancy yellow cushion shape helped Charles Lewis Tiffany earn the nickname “King of Diamonds.” Tiffany acquired the South African diamond in 1878 and its cutting supervised by George Frederick Kunz took nearly a year. Jean Schlumberger designed three jeweled settings for the Tiffany Diamond in 1956. The current setting “Bird on a Rock” was mounted in 1995. By Shipguy - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=7852696

Orlov

Orlov

White with a faint bluish-green, the Orlov is a rarity among historic diamonds, for it retains its original Indian rose-style cut. Data released by the Kremlin give the Orlov's measurements as 32x35x 21mm, its weight 189.62 cts. It was encrusted into the Imperial Sceptre of Russian Empress Catherine the Great By Elkan Wijnberg - http://www.adin.be/nl/explanation-on-orlov-diamond-by-adin-antique-vintage-and-estate-jewelry.htm, Attribution, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=4738295

SIA-97-35715 victoria transvaal-3

SIA-97-35715 victoria transvaal-3

Cut from a 240-carat rough stone found at the Premier Mine in Transvaal, South Africa, in 1951. A champagne-color, recut first to 75 carats, then to 67.89 carats for better proportions. The Victoria-Transvaal Diamond is a pear-shaped brilliant cut and has 116 facets. The yellow gold necklace was designed by Baumgold Brothers, Inc., Photo Chip Clark, Smithsonian Institute http://geogallery.si.edu/index.php/10002859/victoria-transvaal-diamond

Victoria Transvaal

Victoria Transvaal

WHAT PEOPLE SAID

Lucifer Magazine

HP Blavatsky Vol7 - Septembre 1890

The Diamond first shines forth. It was held in peculiar veneration by the ancient Romans: fastened on the left arm it banished all nocturnal terrors and was a safeguard against insanity. Moreover, it was held to possess the power of counteracting the effects of poisons and detecting their presence by becoming dim and moist. This belief continued to a late period, but diamonds (probably pulverised) are enumerated as being among the poisons administered to the unfortunate Sir Thomas Overbury by the infamous Earl and Countess of Somerset. A quaint old writer says: “He who carries the diamond upon him, it gives him hardihood and manhood and keeps his limbs whole. It gives him victory over his enemies if his cause be just: keeps his wit good, preserves him from sorrow and strife and the illusions of wicked spirits.” But the diamond must be given freely, “without coveting or buying”, in order to possess these virtues in their full force: furthermore, it loses its talismanic power by reason of the sins of him who bears it. More than one famous diamond has been regarded as the guardian of the ruler of that country to which it belonged; and the Koh-i-noor now in the possession of the English Government is looked upon in this manner by the natives of India, who see in its transfer the downfall of their ancient monarchy. The diamond is under the influence of Mars, and should, correctly speaking, be set in fine steel, iron being the metal of that planet.

© 2017 by GemsMedicine

Tiffany Yellow

The 128.54 cts, fancy yellow cushion shape helped Charles Lewis Tiffany earn the nickname “King of Diamonds.” Tiffany acquired the South African diamond in 1878 and its cutting supervised by George Frederick Kunz took nearly a year. Jean Schlumberger designed three jeweled settings for the Tiffany Diamond in 1956. The current setting “Bird on a Rock” was mounted in 1995. By Shipguy - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=7852696